Museums and Art

Portrait of Eleanor Gonzaga della Rover, Titian

Portrait of Eleanor Gonzaga della Rover, Titian

Portrait of Eleanor Gonzaga della Rovere - Titian Vecellio. 114x10Z

Typically, Titian (1488 / 1490-1576), creating paintings on mythological and Christian subjects, as well as fantasy portraits such as Flora, was free to use pictorial means. But, portraying noble persons, he seemed to become the secular person he was in life. Loving life and knowing how to enjoy it, he nevertheless knew well what the conventions of etiquette were. Therefore, the portrait shows primarily an aristocrat from a noble Italian family, sitting in a ceremonial pose and dressed in a luxurious outfit. The artist carefully conveyed the friability of velvet, and the luster of gold, and the airiness of lace.

Titian emphasizes dignity Eleanor and through him - her virtue, this concept was important for the Renaissance. The model’s face is impassive, and only a delicate blush on white skin and brown eyes, glowing with mind and strength, revive him and make you feel the character of a woman who exists within the framework prescribed by her estate. If it is true that Eleanor served as a muse to Titian when writing such paintings as “The Girl in a Fur Cape” and especially “Venus Urbinskaya”, then one can imagine the range of possibilities of this painter: he was able to fantasize about the appearance of women he liked, and write strict ceremonial portraits.


Watch the video: Portraits of the Insane (October 2021).