Museums and Art

Jupiter and Thetis, Ingres, 1811

Jupiter and Thetis, Ingres, 1811

Jupiter and Thetis - Jean-Auguste-Dominic Ingres. 1811

This huge canvas, written in 1811, is the last work Ingra (1780-1867), which he performed during his studies in Rome. In front of us Jupiter, the supreme god of the ancient world, sits on the royal throne in his heavenly possessions. In his right hand he holds a scepter, and his left rests on a cloud; next to him is an eagle looking carefully at him. This mighty bird - a symbol of strength and victory - is an attribute of the king of the gods.

Jupiter does not notice ardent attention Thetids, the beautiful Nereids (sea nymphs), as the oracle predicted that a descendant from their union would overthrow him from the throne. To prevent this, Jupiter ordered Thetis to marry a mortal named Peleus. Jealous wife of Jupiter (left on the canvas) Juno looks at them suspiciously.

Ingres sent his work for review to Paris. She aroused ridicule in academic circles and was severely criticized for her lack of variety and for the strange proportions of the figures depicted. Twenty-three years later, this image of omnipotent power was bought by the state.


Watch the video: JÚPITER Y TETIS - DOCUMENTAL DE GRANDES OBRAS DE ARTE DE LA BBC DE LONDRES (October 2021).