Museums and Art

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, Japan

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, Japan

No matter how sad it is to write about the tragedies, but this must be done so that most people learn about Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. Not so long ago, we covered the Atomic Bomb Museum in Nagasaki - we also recommend reading it.

After the terrible tragedy that happened in 1945, the Japanese could not help but create a museum dedicated to this event. This terrible tragedy claimed numerous lives, not everyone will be pleased to read about it. We will continue the story for the most persistent.

I must say that visiting the Peace Museum in Hiroshima is included in the comprehensive school curriculum of Japan, and rightly so. Children must know what harm weapons can cause, and they must learn peace. No one sets up little Japanese against the United States, but they are obliged to know all the details of this tragedy, the Japanese government believes.

Before the explosionAfter the explosion

The museum is divided into two huge buildings: Main and Eastern. In the first one you can see various photographs, documents, as well as videos of the tragedy. It tells about radiation sickness, the disasters and fires that haunted the inhabitants of Hiroshima. The worst thing to see in the Main Building is the layouts. Yes, the models - before and after the explosion. There are no comments here, look at the photos.

The East Building provides general information about nuclear weapons and the participation of Japan in World War II. Various conferences and events for schoolchildren are held here.

The most terrible thing that can be seen in the museum is the things that belonged to the dead. For example, this tricycle (pictured above) belonged to a three-year-old boy who was one and a half thousand (!) Meters from the epicenter of the explosion. The sight is extremely unpleasant. The museum has many such exhibits, and everyone is terrified.

Since 2006, the building of the Main Building of the Peace Museum in Hiroshima has been included in the list of cultural values ​​of Japan.


Watch the video: Hiroshima, then and now. (June 2021).