Museums and Art

The Last Supper, Salvador Dali, 1955

The Last Supper, Salvador Dali, 1955

The Last Supper - Salvador Dali. 167x268

The artist’s fantasies on Gospel themes fill a familiar story with new content. Only outwardly the picture resembles the fresco of the great Leonardo (gestures are similar, the participants are placed at the table). The atmosphere is completely different.

The author intentionally transfers the effect of the picture into modern space. Above the table there is a glass dome, behind which a lifeless landscape opens: the sea, rocky islands, multi-colored sky.

Among those sitting at the stone table, only the central figure of Christ looks alive. The students, bowing their heads respectfully, listen to the Master. Are they listening? Or sleep, lulled by the sounds of His voice? The viewer is forced to interpret the postures of the apostles on his own.

A translucent torso with arms outstretched hovers over the table. On the one hand, he, as the Holy Spirit, unites all the participants in the supper, on the other hand, acts as a kind of foreshadowing of a speedy crucifix.

The perspective of the picture is geometrically accurate. Halves of bread perfectly placed. Students at the table are placed according to the laws of ideal central symmetry.

The airiness, purity and translucency of the figure of Christ is opposed to the reality and heaviness of the figures of the disciples. The viewer gets the impression that in an instant everything will melt in a blue haze: the dome, Christ, the stone table itself. The whole picture is like a sketch of a sensitive, shallow sleep, ready to be interrupted at any moment.

What is the meaning of the artist in his work? Each viewer formulates the answer to this question in his own way. Someone sees in the picture only a meaningless fantasy game, someone finds a new interpretation of the Gospel story in the picture. As usual in the artist’s works, the author’s position remains open, inexplicable, fuzzy.


Watch the video: Salvador Dali-Christ of of the Cross Documentary 23 (May 2021).